The Cognitive style of PowerPoint by Edward Tufte. Żaklina Sochacka. 2/20 cognitive adjective formal related to the process of knowing, understanding, and. Edward R. Tufte. The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint: Pitching Out Corrupts Within. Следующий Слайд. [NEXT SLIDE, PLEASE). ANFAli FulhL HET. FOR RE-. Trevor Murphy, Research based methods for using powerpoint, animation, and video for instruction, Proceedings of the 32nd annual ACM SIGUCCS fall.

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Little did I know that my objection wasn’t just my personal idiosyncrasy, and leave powedpoint to Tufte to broadcast the emperor’s nudity. This is a short ca.

Read this before you build your next presentation. Even if your boss doesn’t want ‘too much detail’ you may be able to cognihive the thing to exclude at least some of the ‘noise’ to the benefit of ‘signal’. You may even be able to convince your boss to let you use another method to communicate your work. I read a esward copy of this essay; then immediately bought my own. As of today it’s about USD 7.

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Return to Book Page. The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint: In corporate and government bureaucracies, the standard method for making a presentation is to talk about a list of points organized onto slides projected up on the wall.

For many years, overhead projectors lit up transparencies, and slide projectors showed high-resolution 35mm slides. Now “slideware” computer programs for presentations are nearly everywhere. Early in the In corporate and government bureaucracies, the standard method for making a presentation is to talk about a list of points organized onto slides projected up on the wall. Early in the 21st century, several hundred million copies of Microsoft PowerPoint were turning out trillions of slides each year.

The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint: Pitching Out Corrupts Within

Alas, slideware often reduces the analytical quality of presentations. In particular, the popular PowerPoint templates ready-made designs usually weaken verbal and spatial reasoning, and almost always corrupt statistical analysis. What is the problem with PowerPoint?

And how can we improve our presentations? HardcoverSecond Edition31 pages.

The cognitive style of PowerPoint – Edward R. Tufte – Google Books

Published January 1st by Graphics Press first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Lists with This Book. When Louis Gerstner became president of IBM, he encountered a big company caught up in ritualistic slideware-style presentations c Q: Slideware helps speakers to outline their talks, to retrieve and show diverse visual materials, and to communicate slides in talks, printed sytle, and internet.

And also to replace serious analysis with chartjunk, over-produced layouts, cheerleader logotypes and branding, and corny clip art. PP convenience for the speaker can be costly to both conten YES!

PP convenience for the speaker can be costly to both content and audience.

These costs result from the cognitive style characteristic of the standard default PP presentation: The appropriate response to such vacuous displays is for people in the audience to speak out: The rate of information transfer is asymptotically approaching zero,” Eventually, the continuing forced exposure to PowerPoint at my job became an irritant as well. This gave me plenty of opportunity to ponder just what a lame-assed piece of garbage PowerPoint was, to consider its various deficiencies and to despair at its insidious ubiquity throughout corporate America.

Tufte argues that presentations developed using Powerpoint are more likely to suffer the following deficiencies: Nonetheless, it is fun to watch him take down PowerPoint. Given the ubiquity of dreadful PowerPoint presentations in the workplace, this pamphlet should be required remedial reading for everyone. View all 4 comments. Jul 17, Chris Hanson rated it liked it.

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Presentation software is no replacement for more technical forms of documentation and prose when making decisions. However, it suffers from two great failings: Petty hubris on the part of the author, and a lack of acknowledgment of the proper role of presentation software. I’m not normally one to condemn a rant for failing to offer good alternatives – and this book more pamphlet is most definitely a rant – but one gets “The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint” has, at its heart, a reasonable message: I’m not normally one to condemn a rant for failing to offer good alternatives – and this book more pamphlet is most definitely a rant – but one gets the impression that Tufte is as pissed off by presentation software’s existence as much as its well-documented misuse.

He offers good alternatives to standard bulleted slides for decision support services, but doesn’t offer more than passing suggestions about what slides might be good for. For the latter, check out “Presentation Zen” by Garr Reynolds.

It’ll teach you, no kidding, how to present like Steve Jobs and Reynolds is one who would know. As for petty hubris, Tufte derides the use of clip-art, builds, transitions, as “PowerPoint Phluff. In exactly those terms. Further, again, there’s no mention of alternatives or tasteful use; instead, the reader is again encouraged to produce handouts with tables of data instead of charts that can be spoken to.

Statistical illiteracy is one thing, willful blindness to the reality of presentation techniques is another. All in all, it’s worth a read if you present regularly, especially in a technical setting.

However, don’t let it be the only work you read on the topic: Sep 12, Trevor rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is brilliant — there is no other word for it. For anyone who has suffered through more PowerPoint presentations than is reasonable to inflict on an unsuspecting universe — this will show you just how stupid the medium can make the message.

The major point of this short essay is that slideware oowerpoint proper name for PowerPoint is generally so badly used that it makes it very hard to learn anything real from what is being presented at all.

He makes this claim on the basis of the limitations of This is brilliant — there is no other word for it. He makes this claim on the basis of the limitations of the presentation format itself.

For example, the resolution is very low in PowerPoint presentations. So, everything ends up being written in headlines or rather haiku and this stype that the text on the screen is ambiguous at best.

His other objection is that the bullet point format leads to remarkably poor thinking. A standard slide might have a title one level of hierarchya series of dot powerpoin a second level of hierarchy and then some sub-dot points a third level. Except that thinking is rarely this hierarchical as he says, this stuff is Medieval in its structures — a place for everything and everything in its place. There may not actually be nearly so much order as is implied by the surface structure of the slides themselves.

Because this structure is virtually imposed by the software itself it makes it hard for those being presented to to do anything more than just accept what is being presented to them. Intellectual engagement — other than as the receiver of information — is impossible by the fact of these slides being as they are. They are linear in the worst sense and do not allow the presenter to do anything other than present. But learning and teaching is supposed to be about responding to the needs of the audience as those needs appear.

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Well, that is not possible. As I was saying about the resolution of the screen one of the read problems with the screen is that it is hard to have very many numbers on one slide. He has a fascinating table in which he shows the number of data elements presented on a standard article in various newspapers or poaerpoint — that is, if there is a graph or a table, how many bits of data is there generally on that graph or table. He then goes though a number of books on how to use PowerPoint and finds that overall the average of data items used on their slides is The only other time he was able to find a medium that used less data in tables was in Pravda in the last years of the Soviet Union.

His point is that more data allows analysis and comparison — the only reason for showing the cognituve in the first place. But his analysis of the Boeing PowerPoint presentations during the in-flight time when they were trying to work out if the shuttle Columbia was going to be safe to land is a fascinating example of how this marketing tool is being misused when it is being used for anything other than the dogmatic presentation of certain facts.

I like his argument — but disagree with it in the end. I absolutely agree about bullet points and think anyone who uses them powerloint have real bullets fired at them. However, PowerPoint can be used well and can be a remarkably good learning tool.

But the final word should go to President Lincoln. View all 22 comments. Short, quick read more like an extended pamphlet that rages against the PowerPoint machine. Tufte makes some good points about how blind use of a pre-set template or format can unfortunately constrain our ability to think about things, especially detailed technical issues. He shows some cringe-worthy examples and especially dives deep into a critique of the PowerPoint slides supplied during the investigation of the Columbia accident.

And yet – although it does seem clear that Powe Short, quick read more like an extended pamphlet that rages against the PowerPoint machine. And yet – although it does seem clear that PowerPoint is not suited to conveying deep technical data and analysis with appropriate nuance and caveats, it’s also NOT well suited for the complete sentences that he loves. In most of the talks I give, the setting is one in which the audience does not want to and will not read long texts off the screen.

Tufte’s suggestion is to eschew PowerPoint in favor of handouts, which indeed can convey much more information more compactly. I like this too, but it doesn’t necessarily work for seminars or conference talks.

His analysis made me reflect on why. I think most of the talks I give are more about conveying ideas. I maintain that this is more engaging and effective than giving the audience something to read. I also rely more and more on images in my talks, because that’s what a screen is really great for!

I don’t think PowerPoint was ever meant to be a standalone product – he’s absolutely right that it is information-poor. The practice of printing out slides and distributing them is a horrible waste of space and paper.